Small charities “failing to measure the impact of their services”

first_img  133 total views,  1 views today For example, it has received funding as part of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport’s (DCMS) Small Charity Training Programme to run training events across the country.  The programme is open to small charities and community groups with an annual income of up to £1 million, which have a local focus within England.Trends in small charitiesThe Small Charity Index has been published for four years. Trends that it has detected between June 2013 and May 2017 include:Total increase for demand for services was 103%Voluntary income increased by 1%Statutory income decreased by 11%Earned income increased by 11%Use of reserves increased by 63%  134 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis30 Many small charities still fail to record and communicate the impact of their services, according to research by the Foundation for Social Improvement (FSI).Its latest Small Charity Index reports that only 52% of small charities whose staff responded said that they consistently measure the impact of nearly all of their services.However, the need to convey impact and demonstrate value is arguably as high as ever. Certainly, many small charities continue to experience rising demand for their services (up 112% since June 2013 according to the FSI) despite their income stagnating.SEE ALSO: FSI awarded £199,580 to finance new small charity training programme (11 April 2017)The report covered the quarter from June to August 2017.The data gathering and analysis of trends is carried out by the FSI through its membership of over 5,600 distinct small charities, each with an annual turnover of under £1.5 million. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis30 Benefits of measuring impactSmall charities know the benefit of being able to measure and show impact. The respondents to the survey gave at least three reasons:to know the difference their services are making to beneficiaries (25% of respondents)meeting funders’ requirements (24%)being able to improve their services (23%)However, this awareness is not being put into practice. The FSI’s Small Charity Index reports that:24% of respondents only measured the impact of half of their services19% measured only a small proportion5% don’t measure impact of their services at all.Pauline Broomhead, CEO of the FSI said: “The Small Charity Index Trends data has shown income to small charities has only seen a 1% growth in four years, so now is a time for small charities to take control of the things we can influence.“By measuring and demonstrating our impact, small charities will be able to prove to funders and donors the difference they are making, helping to increase the share of funding available that they currently receive.”The FSI supports small charities across the UK by offering heavily subsidised and free training and webinars on impact measurement, fundraising and other topics.center_img Tagged with: impact small charities Howard Lake | 9 November 2017 | News Small charities “failing to measure the impact of their services” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img

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