Tag: 南京桑拿

  • Holloway: It’s up to Karl and his agent

    first_imgIan Holloway says the onus is on Karl Henry to find a new club after being told he can leave QPR.West London Sport recently revealed that Henry, 34, had been training with Rangers’ development squad and was free to leave Loftus Road following a fall-out with boss Holloway.Henry is not in Holloway’s first-team plans and will fall even further down the pecking order if QPR sign a midfielder during this month’s transfer window.West London Sport revealed on Tuesday that Rangers are keen on Manchester United’s Sean Goss, either on loan or a permanent deal.Holloway said: “It’s up to Karl and his agent really. I’ve got other midfielders and I might also be able to do something in that area.”Goss, 21, is keen to play first-team football and a number of Championship clubs have expressed an interest in him.See also:QPR want to sign Man Utd youngster’Similarities to Michael Carrick’ – The lowdown on QPR target GossLuongo and Manning in line for contract offers   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

  • 10 months agoWolves eyeing Derby County prospect Sibley

    first_imgWolves eyeing Derby County prospect Sibleyby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEngland U17 international Louie Sibley is attracting Premier League interest.The Mirror says Wolves are on the trail of Derby County prospect Sibley.The Black Country club are beefing up its resources and ambitiously recruiting the best young talent.Defender Sibley was promoted to Derby’s U-23s and scored the goal to earn a 1-1 draw against Manchester United on Thursday night. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

  • Lone ranger Sole Ohioan took different route to OSU

    Of the 23 players on the Ohio State women’s ice hockey team, senior forward Michele Tonnessen is the only Buckeye born and raised in Ohio. The other 22 members hail from dominant hockey domains like Minnesota, Wisconsin and Canada.The Gahanna native has been ice skating for as long as she remembers, but didn’t start playing hockey until she was 10 years old. With two older brothers who played, Tonnessen said she grew up around the sport and quickly became familiar with it.“After watching them play and having to travel around with my parents, I guess I just kind of decided I wanted to play rather than watch,” Tonnessen said.But Tonnessen encountered a dilemma many young girls face in non-traditional hockey states: women teams can be few and far between.Coach Jackie Barto said Ohio doesn’t possess as much strong talent as traditional hockey states, so the “bulk of our recruiting is up north.”“We’re looking to bring in the best hockey players at Ohio State,” Barto said. If there’s an Ohio girl who shows promise at the Division I level, “we’re going to try and make it work.”It was Tonnessen’s sophomore year of high school when college hockey became a real possibilities. After attending OSU’s summer camp, she weighed her skills against other campers and solicited advice from the coaches about her potential.“We knew she would be a hard worker, that she would continue to grow and develop while she’s here in our program,” Barto said.“Once I knew I had a chance, I knew that I wanted it,” Tonnessen said.So Tonnessen played with the boys until her senior year of high school. She switched to the women’s game after OSU coaches told her she’d need experience in the women’s game to be recruited.“It was kind of a no-brainer to switch over,” Tonnessen said.Tonnessen joined the Ohio Flames, a women’s club team, during the 2005-2006 season. The Flames advanced to nationals after becoming the 2006 Under-19 Mid-Am District Champions.Although playing the women’s game took some adjusting for the first two years, Tonnessen believes her experience in men’s hockey has helped her in the long run.“It makes you more physical, it makes you tougher, a bit faster,” Tonnessen said. “I think it just gives you an edge on everybody else. It makes you more competitive.”Even though the women’s game proved to be slower for Tonnessen, she said it took hard work to play the women’s way.“It was a lot more skill and finesse with stick handling,” she said. “You could see plays develop.”But despite the hockey program, Tonnessen said she came to OSU because it was close to home and her two brothers graduated as Buckeyes. It was more about the school and academics. Hockey was just a “bonus that ended up coming along with it,” she said.As Tonnessen’s collegiate hockey career comes to an end, Barto credits Tonnessen for being a great representative of OSU hockey.“She’s been a good teammate; … a positive influence and member of the program,” Barto said. “She’s become the best hockey player she can become.” read more

  • Buckeye Brief Ohio State running back Mike Webers reward struggles of defensive

    Ohio State redshirt junior H-back Parris Campbell races to the end zone for a touchdown that was called back due to a holding penalty during the second quarter of the Buckeyes’ game against Army. Credit: Nick Clarkson | Social Media EditorOhio State rebounded well Saturday after its 31-16 loss to Oklahoma, beating Army 38-7. Coach Urban Meyer shared his view on what he expects to see from the team in the next couple days before its next matchup against UNLV at a press conference Monday afternoon. Here are some of the key takeaways.Struggles of passing defenseA game in which Ohio State’s defense allowed just 19 passing yards could be viewed as a positive for the team, but only if the context is removed. Ohio State faced off against the least-productive passing offense in college football, as Army had accumulated just 17 passing yards over its first two games of the season. The Black Knights almost solely relied on the triple-option for offensive production. After the game, Ohio State went from ranking last in average passing yards allowed per game (403 yards) to ranking 101st (275 yards), but Meyer said Monday that passing defense is still an area the team is looking to improve.He added that the team’s younger and more inexperienced players could earn themselves playing time if he doesn’t notice improvements, listing freshman cornerbacks Shaun Wade and Jeffrey Okudah as two players who have caught his eye.“Wade’s been dinged up a little bit. He didn’t practice at all,” Meyer said. “Okudah is scratching the surface of playing time. [Cornerback Kendall] Sheffield is getting better. He had his best week of practice last week. And I know it’s [Sheffield’s] third year in college, but he’s not had a lot of experience. And [cornerback Denzel] Ward’s gotta continue to get better. Those are the guys we keep moving forward.”Going back to Oklahoma filmIn preparing for their matchup against the Black Knights, the Buckeyes had to put away the film from the Oklahoma game as they prepared for a team that could not have been much more different than the Sooners. Now that Ohio State has beat Army, it can go back to look at and learn from the Week 2 film as it prepares for more commonly used spread offenses in UNLV and Rutgers.In fact, Meyer said the team already has.“[The defense] spent all day yesterday on Oklahoma,” Meyer said. “Graded the effort and rewarded the effort in here with me and the team, and they went to work. And they’ll continue to work on, because now we’ll see another spread offense.”Campbell being used moreWith six wide receivers listed as starters, it could be viewed as a challenge for any one player to stand above the pack. But if anyone in the receiving corps has looked like he could take that next step, it would probably be H-back Parris Campbell. Campbell leads the team in receiving yards with 217, ranks fifth in rushing yards with 32 on three carries and has averaged 36.5 yards on kickoff returns in four attempts. The redshirt junior first flashed his explosion against Indiana in the opening week, when he caught a pass on a short crossing route and bolted through the secondary, taking the ball 74 yards for a touchdown. He used that speed again versus Army, nearly scoring his first rushing touchdown of the season when he broke out past the defense and into the end zone, before it was brought back due to a holding penalty. Meyer said he sees a lot of former Buckeye H-back and current Carolina Panthers wideout Curtis Samuel in Campbell, and added he’d like to get the ball in Campbell’s hands more often.“Everybody can see [the comparison]. I was so upset we had another holding call,” Meyer said. “Parris has that kind of skill set.”Weber could be ‘rewarded’For the bulk of this season, redshirt sophomore running back Mike Weber has been helplessly watching from the sideline as freshman running back J.K. Dobbins dominates on the field. Weber has been limited to 42 yards on seven carries due to a lingering hamstring injury that has prevented him from seeing regular playing time.However, Weber is coming off a season as Ohio State’s primary running back in which he rushed for 1,096 yards on 182 carries and added 91 receiving yards on 23 catches.Despite his injury and Dobbins’ success as the No. 1 running back so far, Weber could still return in a major role for Ohio State’s offense once he is fully healthy.“He’ll be rewarded once he gets back full speed,” Meyer said. “It’s not that Mike’s a lost soul around here … He’s very critical for us as we continue to move forward in conference play coming up in a few weeks.”The third-year running back had just four carries for 13 yards in Saturday’s 38-17 victory over Army.Nuernberger could start as kickoff specialistAnother area Meyer cited kickoff coverage of an area needing dire improvement. Freshman kicker Blake Haubeil has handled kickoff duties so far this season, and Meyer said the freshman and the rest of that special team have not been effective thus far.“Kickoff coverage is a mess right now,” Meyer said. “We don’t have a kicker that can kick the ball. If you notice, one almost went out up in the seats.”Army returned five kicks during the game and averaged 23.2 yards in returns, including a 43- yard return. The Black Knights twice began a drive after a kickoff twice beyond their own 25-yard line, and Oklahoma was able to bring the ball out beyond its own 25-yard line three of its times in four returns. Meyer suggested the poor start for Haubeil could lead to a change, stating that redshirt junior kicker Sean Nuernberger could become the team’s new kickoff specialist. read more

  • Stretchable health sensor could improve monitoring of chronic conditions

    Provided by University of Glasgow New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweat More information: Wenting Dang et al. Stretchable wireless system for sweat pH monitoring, Biosensors and Bioelectronics (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.bios.2018.02.025 Journal information: Biosensors and Bioelectronics A new type of flexible, wearable sensor could help people with chronic conditions like diabetes avoid the discomfort of regular pin-prick blood tests by monitoring the chemical composition of their sweat instead. Citation: Stretchable health sensor could improve monitoring of chronic conditions (2018, February 23) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-stretchable-health-sensor-chronic-conditions.html Explore further Credit: University of Glasgow In a new paper published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics, a team of scientists from the University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering outline how they have built a stretchable, wireless system which is capable of measuring the pH level of users’ sweat.Sweat, like blood, contains chemicals generated in the human body, including glucose and urea. Monitoring the levels of those chemicals in sweat could help clinicians diagnose and monitor chronic conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease and some types of cancers without invasive tests which require blood to be drawn from patients. However, non-invasive, wearable systems require consistent contact with skin to offer the highest-quality monitoring. Current systems are made from rigid materials, making it more difficult to ensure consistent contact, and other potential solutions such as adhesives can irritate skin. Wireless systems which use Bluetooth to transmit their information are also often bulky and power-hungry, requiring frequent recharging.The University of Glasgow team’s new system is built around an inexpensively-produced sensor capable of measuring pH levels which can stretch and flex to better fit the contours of users’ bodies. Made from a graphite-polyurethane composite and measuring around a single square centimetre, it can stretch up to 53% in length without compromising performance. It will also continue to work after being subjected to flexes of 30% up to 500 times, which the researchers say will allow it to be used comfortably on human skin with minimal impact on the performance of the sensor.The sensor can transmit its data wirelessly, and without external power, to an accompanying smartphone app called ‘SenseAble’, also developed by the team. The transmissions use near-field communication, a data transmission system found in many current smartphones which is used most often for smartphone payments like ApplePay, via a stretchable RFID antenna integrated into the system – another breakthrough innovation from the research team. The smartphone app allows users to track pH levels in real time and was demonstrated in the lab using a chemical solution created by the researchers which mimics the composition of human sweat. The research was led by Professor Ravinder Dahiya, head of the University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering’s Bendable Electronics and Sensing Technologies (BEST) group.Professor Dahiya said: “Human sweat contains much of the same physiological information that blood does, and its use in diagnostic systems has the significant advantage of not needing to break the skin in order to administer tests. “Now that we’ve demonstrated that our stretchable system can be used to monitor pH levels, we’ve already begun additional research to expand the capabilities of the sensor and make it a more complete diagnostic system. We’re planning to add sensors capable of measuring glucose, ammonia and urea, for example, and ultimately we’d like to see a system ready for market in the next few years.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more